Yanukovych reverses Ukraine’s position on Holodomor famine

0

Дата: 28-06-2010 | Автор: Yanina Lonskaya | Размещено: No comments , Opinions , Politics and economics

Russian-Ukrainian relations enter new stage

undefined

It is “unjust” to call the Stalin-era famine that killed millions across the Soviet Union a genocide of the Ukrainian people, President Viktor Yanukovych said on Tuesday.

Yanukovych’s statement to the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) marks a complete reversal of the policy of his predecessor, Viktor Yushchenko, who sought international recognition of the 1932-1933 Great Famine, known to Ukrainians as the Holodomor, as genocide.

PACE will discuss on Wednesday a report commemorating the victims of the Soviet famine that includes an amendment recognizing the Holodomor as a genocide of the Ukrainian people.

“We consider it incorrect and unjust to consider the Holodomor a fact of genocide of a certain people,” Yanukovych said, calling it “a common tragedy” of the Soviet people.

The Ukrainian president said not only Ukrainian, but also Russian, Belarusian and Kazakh people starved during the famine.

“Those were consequences of Stalin’s totalitarian regime, his attitude to people,” he said.

More than 3 million people perished in Ukraine due to the famine, and Ukrainian nationalists say Russia, as the legal successor of the Soviet Union, should bear responsibility. Yushchenko, who was known for his anti-Russian policies as president, led Ukraine’s efforts to secure international recognition of the famine as an act of genocide.

Yanukovych was elected in February to succeed Yushchenko and swiftly aligned Kiev closer to Moscow, including by agreeing to extend Russia’s lease on a naval base in Crimea.

Russia says the famine cannot be considered an act that targeted Ukrainians, as millions of people from different ethnic groups also lost their lives in vast territories across the Soviet Union.

A draft PACE resolution on the famine says it was caused by “cruel and deliberate actions and policies of the Soviet regime” responsible for the deaths of “millions of innocent people,” not only in Ukraine, but also in Belarus, Kazakhstan, Moldova and Russia. Relative to its population, Kazakhstan is believed to be the worst affected Soviet republic, the document says.

STRASBOURG, April 27 (RIA Novosti)

PACE urges former Soviet states to open Holodomor archives

undefined

The Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) is drafting a resolution urging Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Moldova to open their archives on the Great Famine (Holodomor) of the Ukrainian SSR in the 1930s.

The report commemorating the victims of the Holodomor in the former USSR will be discussed during the PACE session on Wednesday.

“The Assembly welcomes the important work already done in Belarus, Kazakhstan, Russia and in particular in Ukraine in order to ease access to archives, and calls on the competent authorities of these countries to open up all their archives and facilitate access thereto to all researchers, including from other states,” the document says.

PACE also called for other Council of Europe member states to make their national archives open and accessible.

The draft resolution says the famine, caused by the “cruel and deliberate actions and policies of the Soviet regime” was responsible for the deaths of “millions of innocent people,” not only in Ukraine, but also in Belarus, Kazakhstan, Moldova and Russia.

The report also mentioned the millions who died in Kazakhstan. It said the ratio of the dead to the whole population in the country is believed to be the highest among all peoples of the former USSR.

Russia has said that it cannot accept a number of amendments to the PACE resolution, including a proposal to recognize the Holodomor as a genocide of the Ukrainian people.

Russia says the famine cannot be considered an act that targeted Ukrainians, as millions of people from different ethnic groups also lost their lives in vast territories across the Soviet Union.

Ukrainian nationalists say Russia, as the legal successor of the Soviet Union, should bear responsibility for the famine in which more than 3 million people perished in Ukraine.

Under former president Viktor Yushchenko, Ukraine was seeking international recognition of the famine as an act of genocide.

STRASBOURG, April 26 (RIA Novosti)

Legal precedent in Ukraine: journalist allowed to doubt Holodomor as genocide

undefined

A court in east Ukraine has created a legal precedent, ruling that a local journalist has the right to doubt that the 1932-1933 Holodomor famine was an act of genocide of the Ukrainian nation, the Party of Regions reported Thursday.

Ukrainian nationalists say that Russia, as the legal successor of the Soviet Union, should bear responsibility for the famine in which more than 3 million people perished in Ukraine. Russia says the famine cannot be considered an act that targeted Ukrainians, as millions of people from different ethnic groups also lost their lives in vast territories across the Soviet Union.

The court in the Donetsk Region refused to grant a lawsuit by Vasily Kovalenko, a Ukrainian businessman, against Rodnoye Priazovye newspaper editor Sergei Shvedko over an article on Holodomor in which Shvedko said it was not genocide.

Kovalenko asked the court to rule the article was against the law and that it humiliated national dignity and insulted the memory of Holodomor victims. However the court ruled on Tuesday that the article contained assessments and the personal viewpoint of the author and does not violate the law in any way.

Shvedko said: “The fact that the court sided with the journalist who voiced his civil position confirms once again that in a democratic state, viewpoints and thoughts of a person cannot be an illegal act regardless of how much certain forces would want that.”

Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych said during his presidential campaign that Kiev’s attempts to blame Russia for Holodomor were unjust. Under former president Viktor Yushchenko, Ukraine, which says over 3.9 million people died during the famine, was seeking international recognition of the famine as an act of genocide.

Yanukovych, who headed the Party of Regions until he was forced to suspend his membership following his election as president, is supported in Ukraine’s southern and eastern regions.

In January, a court in Kiev found Bolshevik leaders, including dictator Joseph Stalin, guilty of genocide against Ukrainians during Holodomor, but dropped criminal proceedings “due to the suspects’ deaths.”

DONETSK, March 11 (RIA Novosti)

Ukraine court finds Bolsheviks guilty of Holodomor genocide

undefined

A court in Kiev found Bolshevik leaders guilty of genocide against Ukrainians during the 1932-1933 Holodomor famine, the country’s National Security Service said on Wednesday.

The court found dictator Joseph Stalin and several other senior Soviet officials guilty, but dropped criminal proceedings “over the suspects’ deaths.”

The court examined the case filed by the security service and upheld “investigators’ conclusions that the leaders of the totalitarian Bolshevik regime organized … the genocide against the Ukrainian ethnic group intentionally creating conditions aimed at its partial physical elimination,” the service said in a statement.

Ukraine, which says that more than 3.9 million people died during the famine, has been seeking international recognition of the famine as an act of genocide.

A number of Ukrainian nationalist parties say that Russia, as the legal successor of the Soviet Union, should bear responsibility for the famine.

Russia says the famine cannot be considered an act that targeted Ukrainians, as millions of people from different ethnic groups also lost their lives in vast territories across the Soviet Union.

Last year, the United Nations General Assembly refused to include a discussion of the famine on its official session agenda.

KIEV, January 13 (RIA Novosti)

Ukraine says Holodomor genocide case almost solved

Ukraine’s Security Service (SBU) has almost completed investigation into an alleged genocide of Ukrainians during the 1932-1933 Holodomor famine, the presidential press service said Tuesday.

President Viktor Yushchenko held a conference on Tuesday on the investigation into the case.

“[Deputy SBU chief] Nikolai Gerasimenko has reported that the case has almost been investigated and its materials will be handed to the Prosecutor General’s Office within a week,” the press service said.

In late 2006, Ukraine’s parliament recognized the Stalin-era famine known as Holodomor as an act of genocide by the Soviet authorities.

Russia says the famine cannot be considered an act that targeted Ukrainians, as millions of people from different ethnic groups also lost their lives in vast territories across the Soviet Union.

Kiev has been seeking international recognition of the famine as an act of genocide. Last year, the United Nations General Assembly refused to include a discussion of the famine on its official session agenda.

A number of Ukrainian nationalist parties say that Russia, as the legal successor of the Soviet Union, should bear responsibility for the famine.

KIEV, December 22 (RIA Novosti)

Russia says Polish WWII ‘genocide’ resolution harms ties

undefined

MOSCOW, September 17 (RIA Novosti) – A Polish resolution that calls Soviet actions in Poland in 1939 “genocide” will do nothing to benefit bilateral ties, a spokesman for the Russian Foreign Ministry said on Thursday.

The document, stating that the deployment of Soviet troops in eastern Poland in 1939 “had traits of genocide,” will be adopted by the Polish parliament without a vote or debate on September 23.

“Such an attitude would probably not benefit our bilateral relations” Andrei Nesterenko said.

On September 17, 1939, Soviet troops entered western parts of Ukraine and Belarus that had been under Polish control since the end of the 1919-1921 Polish-Soviet War.

The Soviet Union said the move was to protect Ukrainians and Belarusians as the Polish government had fled the country in the face of the German attack and could no longer guarantee the security of its own citizens.

Among other episodes that could be classified as genocide, the document mentions the Katyn massacre, in which several thousand Polish POWs were executed in western Russia’s Katyn forest in 1940.

Russia’s NATO envoy, Dmitry Rogozin, accused the Polish leadership of Russophobic sentiments.

“The Polish version [of the 1939 events] is a lie and the attitude of the Polish leadership is provocative,” Rogozin said, adding that Poland “continues to surprise Russia and other European capitals.”

“However, this is now a headache for NATO and the European Union, where the Poles act in an extremely destructive and destabilizing manner,” he said.

The Russian diplomat added that by accusing Russia of genocide, Poland risks being accused of genocide against the Russian people during the Time of Troubles in the early 17th century, when Polish forces ransacked Moscow.

Ukraine does not blame Russia for Holodomor – Yushchenko

KIEV, November 28 (RIA Novosti) – Ukraine does not think Russia is to blame for the 1932-1933 Holodomor famine, President Viktor Yushchenko said.

“We do not accuse Russia, we do not accuse the Russian nation,” he told the Inter TV channel prior to Saturday’s commemoration of a Holodomor anniversary by the ex-Soviet state, adding that the country that is to blame does not exist now.

In late 2006, Ukraine’s parliament recognized the Stalin-era famine known as Holodomor as an act of genocide by the Soviet authorities.

Russia says the famine cannot be considered an act that targeted Ukrainians, as millions of people from different ethnic groups also lost their lives in vast territories across the Soviet Union.

Kiev has been seeking international recognition of the famine as an act of genocide. Last year, the United Nations General Assembly refused to include a discussion of the famine on its official session agenda.

A number of Ukrainian nationalist parties say that Russia, as the legal successor of the Soviet Union, should bear responsibility for the famine.

http://en.rian.ru/society/20091128/157016050.html

undefined

undefined

undefined

Holodomor

The Holodomor (Ukrainian: Голодомор; translation: murder by hunger) was a famine in the Ukrainian SSR from 1932–1933, during which millions of inhabitants died of starvation in a peacetime catastrophe unprecedented in the history of Ukraine.
Estimates on the total number of casualties within Soviet Ukraine range mostly from 2.6 million to 10 million. Primarily as a result of the economic and trade policies instituted by Joseph Stalin, millions of Ukrainians starved to death over the course of a single year. The causes of the famine are a controversial issue and scholars disagree on the relative importance of natural factors,bad economic policies or engineered measures towards Ukrainian peasants. The famine was part of a wider Soviet famine of 1932–1933.

The root cause of the Holodomor is a subject of scholarly debate. Some scholars have argued that the Soviet policies that caused the famine may have been designed as an attack on the rise of Ukrainian nationalism, and therefore fall under the legal definition of genocide. The Holodomor is also known as the “terror-famine in Ukraine” and “famine-genocide in Ukraine”. Others, however, conclude that the Holodomor was a consequence of the economic problems associated with radical economic changes implemented during the period of Soviet industrialization.

As of March 2008, several governments have recognized the actions of the Soviet government as an act of genocide. The joint statement at the United Nations in 2003 has defined the famine as the result of cruel actions and policies of the totalitarian regime that caused the deaths of millions of Ukrainians, Russians, Kazakhs and other nationalities in the USSR. On 23 October 2008 the European Parliament adopted a resolution that recognized the Holodomor as a crime against humanity.

On January 12, 2010, the court of appeals in Kiev opened hearings into the “fact of genocide-famine Holodomor in Ukraine in 1932-33″. In May 2009 the Security Service of Ukraine had started a criminal case “in relation to the genocide in Ukraine in 1932-33″.In a ruling on January 13, 2010 the court found Joseph Stalin and other Bolshevik leaders guilty of genocide against the Ukrainians; however, the court dropped criminal proceedings against the leaders, Joseph Stalin, Vyacheslav Molotov, Lazar Kaganovich, Stanislav Kosior, Pavel Postyshev and others, due to their deaths.This decision became effective on January 21, 2010, after not having been contested in the Supreme Court of Ukraine for seven days.

On April 26, 2010, newly elected Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych, told Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe members that Holodomor was a common tragedy that struck Ukrainians and other Soviet peoples, and that it would be wrong to recognize the Holodomor as an act of genocide against one nation. He stated that “The Holodomor was in Ukraine, Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan. It was the result of Stalin’s totalitarian regime. But it would be wrong and unfair to recognize the Holodomor as an act of genocide against one nation.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holodomor

Поделиться в соц. сетях

Оставить комментарий или два